News

Bill Belichick in New York?

by Ben Diamond Photographed by Billy Farrell/PMC
Monday, January 8, 2018
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It’s easy to assume that AVENUE’s readers are more comfortable at the Opera than at the Meadowlands. But look past their gilded facades and you’ll find that quite a number of them bleed blue.


So one imagines that quite a few ears on Park Avenue perked up from the news that the Giants are attempting to woo Bill Belichick away from the Patriots. It make sense—with rumors of friction between Belichick, Tom Brady and owner Robert Kraft, and with the Giants’s own coaching problems, the timing seems almost too good to be true. And lest it be forgotten, Belichick is a great coach, maybe the only man able to resurrect the Giants’ flagging fortunes.


It wouldn’t be his first time coaching in the Big Apple, either. Belichick was an Assistant coach with the Giants for some 12 years, during the team’s Big Blue Wrecking Crew era.


But Bill Belichick? In New York? Really? It just feels wrong.


For his part, Belichick has denied any interest in the job, saying that he “absolutely” plans on staying with Patriots. But let’s ignore that for a minute, and speculate on how the city would treat the rumpled Bostonian. Would he become a fixture on the charity ball circuit? Would we see his grey hoodie at the Met Gala?


It’s less far-fetched than it sounds. Yes, sports allegiances run deeper in this town than you’d think. But while society can be vicious to those it distrusts—just ask Tinsley Mortimer—it can also be forgiving. Henry Kissinger is still feted by liberals and conservatives alike, after all, and he illegally bombed Cambodia. Running a successful sports franchise in (ugh) Boston isn’t the stain it once was. Maybe we will see Belichick having cocktails at Jay McInerney’s.


So long as the Giants win, that is.



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