At Home

Everything Must Go!

Friday, October 6, 2017
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Jerome Stern, who died earlier this year at 93, lived surrounded by the finer things. His beautiful seventeen-room, bay front Quogue estate—”Camp Jerome,” as it was known—is unquestionably one of the area’s finest homes. Inside, the family’s art collection—featuring acknowledged masters like Pablo Picasso, David Smith and David Hammons—rivals the beauty of the home itself. Stern’s collection was admired widely during his life. “I can’t think of anyone in New York as universally liked by the art community as Jerome,” said Amy Cappellazzo of Sotheby’s. “Normally, as collectors get older, they become sentimental about the time they came of age. Jerome always stayed contemporary.”


But now, after Jerome’s sad passing, the Stern family has decided to put it all up for sale. Over the course of ten auctions, from now until March 2018, Sotheby’s will be selling off the more than 250 works in the family’s collection. Works like David Hammons’s Untitled (1975), Wangechi Mutu’s A Dragon Kiss Always Ends in Ashes (2007), Pablo Picasso’s Le baiser (1930) and David Smith’s steel Voltri-Bolton X—some of which have been in the Stern family collection for decades—will finally hit the auction block.The house, too, will go on the market for $23.5 million, listed exclusively through Corcoran.


It’s extraordinary to see so much beauty is for sale. But this is an extraordinary collection, and an extraordinary home.



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