Hidden Gem

Love and the Snake

Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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As one of the oldest legendary tokens, the snake has held many meanings throughout its history: from royalty and sexual passion, to immortality and endless love.

The Victorian era gave birth to the widespread popularity of the serpent design, when Queen Victoriaa descendant of the Georges through her father and of the House of Saxe-Coburg through her mothermarried Prince Albert. The engagement ring that he presented to her featured, yes, a snake motif, set in emeralds, her birthstone.

Today, many of the most coveted bejeweled snake designs are Victorian or Art Nouveau, and slither between estate and antique jewelers. But the modern-day interpretations are equally desirable and rarified. De Grisogono’s Mascote snake ring (shown above) is a contemporary piece with a nod to the past. It’s made of mammoth tusk and white and brown diamonds, and is set in pink gold.

Like the snake, no matter how many twists and turns it makes, love is eternal. 


Carol Brodie is a jewelry expert and the host of Rarities Fine Jewelry on HSN. She writes our “Hidden Gem” monthly column. Read her past stories on the Marie Louise Diadem and Verdura’s Potted Plant Brooch and stay tuned for what’s to come! 


Photo courtesy of De Grisogono.

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